The Sea Wall

The last of my series of “Lota.” While I am sure there is a lot more tintillating facts to write about, I need to focus on other things.

THE SEA WALL OF WYNNUM, MANLY AND LOTA.

Writing about a wall is somewhat obscure but as I look at this wall almost every day, it occurred to me that it too would have a history.

Picture no. 1 is the start of the sea wall at Wynnum Creek and Picture no. 2 encapsulates the hard work that has gone into the wall.

Wynnum Creek

The beginning of the Wall

Picture no. 1 Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

An example of exceptional stone work

An example of exceptional stone work

Picture no. 2 Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

The Wall at Manly

The Wall at Manly

Picture no. 3 Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

Access to Manly

Access to Manly

Picture no. 4 Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

Picture no. 3 and 4 captures the wall amoungst the beautiful surroundings at Manly, Queensland.

 

“Although reclamation of the marshy and muddy land along the foreshore began shortly after the original survey of the esplanade area in 1859, building of the sea wall all the way to Lota was not undertaken until the Depression years (early 1930’s) when it was undertaken as “Relief Work,” for unemployed people. Prior to this, there were no park areas along the foreshore at Lota, so the thousands of people who flock to Lota during the weekends owe many thanks to the foresight of our ancestors.” (p 12-13) Nicholson, Cherrie. 2002. Lota through Local Eyes: Stories of a little known Brisbane suberb and the people who call Lota home.  Cherrie A. Nicholson: Brisbane.

The end of the Wall at Lota

The end of the Wall at Lota

Picture no. 5 Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

 

Youth Homelessness

While working at 4zzz as a Researcher/Announcer, I carried out the following broadcast on 14.05.2008.

Commissioner for the National Inquiry into Youth Homelessness ‘Father Wally’ details his history working for homeless young people in Brisbane and details how he set up the Youth Advocacy Centre. Wally says he was asked to be a commissioner on the first Burdegan [*] Inquiry into Youth Homelessness and he suggests this influenced his selection in the latest inquiry. Wally gives an overview of the formal hearings in every state and territory and he details how he went about writing the report. Wally says the recommendations will go directly to the PM’s Taskforce on Homelessness and the Green Paper due out later this month. Wally suggests ‘on the ground’ in Brisbane things can be done immediately with things like a welfare infrastructure at schools for early intervention. Wally details how Child Protection figures have ‘blown out’ and it is now difficult to get a young person over 14 to receive child protection services if needed. Wally suggests young people who have been in care all their lives have received little preparation for independence and are becoming homeless.
 
Commissioner for the National Inquiry into Youth Homelessness ‘Father Wally’ gives an overview of the findings of the National Inquiry into Youth Homelessness, saying he has mentioned findings on Child Protection and there were also findings on services for Indigenous young people being lacking. Wally says youth refuges in Aust are full, meaning only half of those who apply get in. Wally says medium and long term accommodation for young people is ‘chockers’ and there are no exit points as young people cannot get into the private rental market with costs being up. Wally says there are increasing numbers of young people with ‘high and complex needs’. Wally says there are four or five youth specific drug and alcohol services in QLD and they do a good job. Wally says there is a lack of youth specific mental health service beds and he says all these services are in the south east corner. Wally says his recommendations are about a national policy and national strategy like climate change, along with an expansion of early intervention programs. Wally says the Fed Govt put in the Reconnect Program which is ‘great’ but only covers a third of Aust. Wally says the QLD Govt has put in the ‘great’ Youth Support Coordinators Program but it does not reach all the schools it should reach. Wally says this is a funding issue in ‘one sense’ but he notes Aust has done ‘so well’ economically and the money needed is ‘peanuts’. Wally notes a helicopter project that was extremely expensive was just ‘junked’. Wally says he thinks Child and Youth Mental Health Services do a good job and they are looking expand services in QLD. 
 
Commissioner for the National Inquiry into Youth Homelessness ‘Father Wally’ continues the discussion on youth homelessness, giving advice on what to do when one is asked for money by a homeless person, stressing the importance of treating them like a human being and giving advice on where to refer people who need help. Wally details how a lot of young homeless people cannot access medical services as a lot of doctors do not bulk bill and it is ‘daunting’ to access an emergency dept. Wally details how a doctor, lawyer and some teachers have asked how they can help and he says people need to look where they can ‘insert’ themselves. Wally lists places around for homeless young people, including Brisbane Youth Service, the Salvation Army, Teen Challenge, Mission Australia and the police in the Valley, who he says have a program ‘something about the beat’ who are doing good programs with young people. 

Lota Creek supplies entertainment and food

Locals and visitors enjoying a lazy day by the bay at Lota Camping Reserve in the 1930s.  You can see the iconic bathing boxes and a glimpse of the sandy shoreline.

Locals and visitors enjoying a lazy day by the bay at Lota Camping Reserve in the 1930s. You can see the iconic bathing boxes and a glimpse of the sandy shoreline.

Courtesy of the Brisbane City Council.

“Swimming, fishing and visiting the beach were popular pastimes during the development of Lota.  Many families supplemented their diet with fish, crabs and oysters caught locally in the bay.  Hard to believe today, but there was a lovely strip of sand along the foreshore…” Robert McIntosh (Holiday visitor from 1927, then current resident), taken from the delightful book – Nicholson, Cherrie. 2002. Lota through Local Eyes: Stories of a little known Brisbane suburb and the people who call Lota Home.  Cherrie A. Nicholson, Brisbane.

 

Capturing the beauty of the food source for many early and present residents. Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis.

Capturing the beauty of the food source for many early and present residents. Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis.

Lota has provided a food source and entertainment source since the first settlement (and I am sure our Quandamooka people benefitted from Lota Creek long before white man came).  The first picture captures Lota in the 1930s as a source of entertainment.  The second picture captures the raw beauty of Lota Creek, and the third picture captures a modern-day vessel for gathering food.

A present day (2014), home made "crab vessel." Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

A present day (2014), home-made “crab vessel.” Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

There was a crooked house in a crooked St – Bellevue Pde, Lota

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile.

He found a crooked sixpence upon a crooked stile.

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,

And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

Bellevue Parade, Lota

Bellevue Parade, Lota

Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

 

Bellevue Parade

Bellevue Parade

Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

 

The crooked theme in this post is in reference to the crooked sign outside of my crooked home.  Bellevue Parade was once called Ann Street and runs from the Esplanade to Lota Creek. I may live in a crooked house but living in the corner of Lota is pretty special.