My pondering place High tide at Lota – 2.7 m – 10 am – 11 am (New Moon 20.01.2015)

High tide at Lota 2.7m. 10 am – 11 am (new moon 20.01.2015)

Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis
Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

Lota Creek supplies entertainment and food

Locals and visitors enjoying a lazy day by the bay at Lota Camping Reserve in the 1930s.  You can see the iconic bathing boxes and a glimpse of the sandy shoreline.
Locals and visitors enjoying a lazy day by the bay at Lota Camping Reserve in the 1930s. You can see the iconic bathing boxes and a glimpse of the sandy shoreline.

Courtesy of the Brisbane City Council.

“Swimming, fishing and visiting the beach were popular pastimes during the development of Lota.  Many families supplemented their diet with fish, crabs and oysters caught locally in the bay.  Hard to believe today, but there was a lovely strip of sand along the foreshore…” Robert McIntosh (Holiday visitor from 1927, then current resident), taken from the delightful book – Nicholson, Cherrie. 2002. Lota through Local Eyes: Stories of a little known Brisbane suburb and the people who call Lota Home.  Cherrie A. Nicholson, Brisbane.

 

Capturing the beauty of the food source for many early and present residents. Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis.
Capturing the beauty of the food source for many early and present residents. Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis.

Lota has provided a food source and entertainment source since the first settlement (and I am sure our Quandamooka people benefitted from Lota Creek long before white man came).  The first picture captures Lota in the 1930s as a source of entertainment.  The second picture captures the raw beauty of Lota Creek, and the third picture captures a modern-day vessel for gathering food.

A present day (2014), home made "crab vessel." Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis
A present day (2014), home-made “crab vessel.” Photography by Julie-Ann Ellis

Lota Creek Info

“Lota Creek is a small coastal waterway which divides Lota from its neighbouring suburb of ransome.

The 18 square kilometres of catchment area is a complex mixture of bushland, wetland and tidal systems, rural land surrounding the creek and estuarine systems and a foreshore dominated by urban development.

Lota Creek is fed by several tributaries having their source in the suburbs of Gumdale and Manly West.

The native vegetation of the catchment area ranges from Melaleuca and Eucalypt forest in the upper reaches to mangroves and melalueca and other wetland habitats in the lower sections.

These environments have been identified as important for the native animals and the seal life of Moreton Bay.

Urban development has been significant in the catchment of Lota Creek.”

Lota History: Past and Present. By Year 5, Lota State School, 2006.

Obtained from the Wynnum Manly Historical Society.Image